Tag Archives: strategy

The Results are Immediate and Very Effective


Absolutely love getting a testimonial from a customer that finishes with the phrase: “I would highly recommend it to any business as the results are immediate and very effective”.

Received feedback from Leonie Spencer at Lifestyle Travel in Ballarat.  Leonie runs a very successful travel agency and they have been providing exceptional service to their clients for well over ten years.

One of the things that inspires me about Leonie is that she is always willing to look for better ways of doing things.  She is very open to new opportunities to enable the business to serve their clients.  In this vein, Leonie engaged us to provide some communication training for her team prior to Christmas.  It went really well and the sessions with had with the individual team members, the management team and the whole group were not only very effective, they were also good fun.  They’re a wonderful group of people.

I was absolutely chuffed to receive the following from Leonie early this week (and I have not edited a thing – I have highlighted a couple of bits though):

Our business, Lifestyle Travel Ballarat, undertook the TTI Disc program facilitated by MTA Accounting a few months ago.  We experienced immediate positive results with our team especially in our communication with each other.

The program is very empowering and enables each individual to understand their natural style of giving and receiving communication and in turn how to adapt and understand the preferred style of communication of fellow team members & clients.  In effect, speaking to others  in the way they prefer as opposed to interacting with everyone in the same communication style.  Our business is totally reliant of good client relationships and already we are seeing great benefits in applying the techniques learnt in the program.

We are saving valuable time on emails, quoting and creating proposals for our clients, by simply being more specific and asking clients how they prefer to receive correspondence from us. Some just want the facts and others need more detail so we can adapt accordingly.  Using effective communication eliminates all the grey and both parties are on the same page.

The key major benefit from a management perspective is that we now have clear direction in the best & most effective way to communicate with our team.  Every person is different and this program highlights exactly how each individual likes to be spoken to and the way they prefer to be given tasks & direction.

There have been many positive and practical examples of where our team have purposely considered the style of the other person before reacting or responding to an issue.  Thinking about the best way to address an issue has allowed us to view & accept each other based on our differences as opposed to judging and reacting based on our own thoughts and style.

Thank you to Matthew, Simone & Madeline from MTA Accounting for the professional delivery of this program.   I would highly recommend it to any business as the results are immediate and very effective.

Having seen the difference the program made to Leonie’s business and received feedback from various team members in the business, it is abundantly clear that this has worked exceptionally well for them.

What would be the impact on your business if your people had this competitive advantage?  What would it mean for your culture, your effectiveness and your results?

If you’d like to find out more, please drop us a line.  We love doing this type of work – because it works!

When you’re ready for “immediate and very effective” results, why not give your business the opportunity that Leonie gave hers?

On Cashflow Management – and a hint!


Cashflow management is a critical issue for many business owners.

Typically, your cashflow comes under strain in the following circumstances (not an exhaustive list):

  • your business is growing
  • stock levels increase (eg: lead-up to Christmas for retailers)
  • bringing on new staff
  • increasing production capacity
  • diversifying your business activities

Each of these things can be a “cash thief”.

Let’s consider the issue of inventory(stock) management.  The more stock you have on hand, the more cash you have tied up.  I explain this in more detail here, here and here.  By reducing your stock levels, you free up a lot of cash, however you need to balance out the level of stock you need.  You cannot sell what you don’t have!  Effective stock management makes a huge difference to your cashflow.

Cashflow management can also be impacted by increasing production capacity.  Being able to make a lot more “stuff” requires you to have the raw materials, equipment and people to do this.  All this costs.  Your wages come in each week, your suppliers need to be paid each month and the equipment needs to be purchased/financed.  All this robs cash from the business – and you haven’t yet produced anything you can sell.  By building your capacity, you will be able to (hopefully) generate more sales and/or better margins.  But you have to spend first.  This is where your cashflow management needs to be carefully curated.

The Hint

A number of our customers have pretty regular sales.  They use this to reduce their margins (sometimes!) to generate additional sales and hence cashflow.  You find that there is a very clear cycle for this.

One of my favourite fishing tackle stores is in Melbourne.  They have a great range of products, know what they are on about and provide great service.  Over the past year or so, I have noticed that they are having regular sales in the sixth week after the end of each quarter.  This is because they have the Tax Office commitments to meet.  They need to free up cash to pay our friends in Canberra. Knowing this, you, as a customer, can manage your time for purchasing gear.

The same thing occurs in a lot of businesses (especially retail).  Have a look at the sales cycles and you will see a trend.  The margin is better in your pocket than the retailer’s!

So…

Any time you look at the cashflow in your business, get behind the issue to find out what is driving it.  Sales too low?  Margins being squeezed?  Inventory too high?  Expanding?  Diversifying?  Any and all of these can have a significant impact on your cash reserves.

Cashflow management can be difficult.  But when you look behind the numbers and develop your understanding of what drives your cashflow, you will be in a far better position to make the decisions and changes needed to improve things.

We have access to some really powerful cashflow modelling tools that will enable you to see the real picture – going forward.  If you would like to have a chat with us about how we can help you get a better handle on your cashflow management, give us a call!

On Investing in People


The most astute business owners understand the power of investing in people.

The other week, we received some very satisfying feedback from one of our customers.

We have been doing work with the Executive Team at Federation Business School at Federation University over the past few months.  The work has revolved around the way the Executive works and communicates together.

The Testimonial

Bob O’Shea, the Executive Dean of the Business School very kindly sent through a testimonial and here are some quotes from it to give you an insight into what they’ve experienced (our highlights):

  •    … only one month since we had the group feedback session facilitated by you I can tell you that is has had a very positive effect on the way the group works together
  •    … let me say that we have all been very impressed with the way you handled the whole process from the very beginning
  •    The personal feedback sessions you … had with each member discussing their results and their profile in depth and without raising defences was very powerful and taken on by all in a very positive way
  •   I have noticed (and other Team members have told me that they too have noticed) a marked change in the dynamics of our Executive meetings
  •   It is fascinating to observe as for example previously aggressive members are moderating their language and style in order to have a [more] positive impact
  •   Interestingly and importantly we are each experiencing this sort of behaviour modification outside of the meetings where individual team members are using their [personal] insights to enhance one-on-one meetings they have with their fellow team  members
  •   …[two senior team members have] said that they now consulted each other on matters previously avoided
  •   …[Professor] told me that these meetings were the most productive senior level meetings he had been involved in for 20 years
  •   … it is early days yet but the signs are there that this is a very worthwhile investment

The Experiment

I have shared the above with a number of people across various industries (from education to medical, legal, real estate, insurance, retail and manufacturing).  When sending out the letters and emails, I was reviewing in my own mind whether the recipients would be interested in learning more.

It became a fascinating experiment.  There were, of the numerous business owners I contacted, a couple who I thought – “yep, these guys are future-focused, interested in learning and wanting to challenge things whilst bringing their teams along”.  The others would give me the “usual brush-off”.  Guess what happened?

Using the exact same email/letter format, those whom I expected to come back with interest did so.  I don’t know whether this is confirmation bias or not.  I don’t believe so.

Similar to Bob at Federation University, some business owners understand the importance investing in people.  They also understand that any investment they make in this space will have a very significant positive return.

Are you one of these?

If you are, give me a yell.

 

On Development and Glasses – Communication Matters!


Do you ever feel like you know you have potential to be better – particularly with your communication?  Are you constantly frustrated with being unable to do what is needed?  When looking at business and people development, what glasses are you wearing?

Your position is not abnormal – it is in fact very normal.  But, what can you do about it?

People tend to see the world, their situation, other people or things as either “good” or “bad”.  They can fall into the view of black v white.  This again is natural and your normal approach will be to follow your tried and true strategy.

I know this very well as one of my relatives is a constant “nay-sayer” -nothing is ever seen in a positive light.  When at a restaurant, they will place their order.  As dishes come out of the kitchen, you will hear “oh, I should have ordered that”.

We see this too in many businesses – owners/managers of businesses will recruit people who are just like them.  This is generally because the “feel” is right – there is an automatic preference for liking someone like them.

Great teams consist of a broad range of people who work well together.  You want to have a diversity of views, a range of communication and listening styles and a healthy attitude to risk.  Style blending will see better decisions made and more effective analysis performed.  You don’t want all the same type of people just agreeing with each other!

Considering issues around strategy and business management, only looking at things from one perspective.  This can result in either missing opportunities completely or being so focused on one aspect of an option the “big picture” is overlooked.  There are obviously other forms this can take.  The main point though relates to the ability to have robust (sometimes “prickly”) discussions and being open to a range of contributions/inputs.

Understanding that recruitment and development of people with differing styles adds a depth and robustness to your business is a real positive.  Differing approaches will keep things bouncing along.  Your conversations will go “broader and deeper” than having a lot of the same folk discussing an issue.

When it comes time for you to consider what sort of person you want to recruit or promote/develop, have a serious think about choosing someone who has a different style to you.  Sure, there will be times when the discussions will be a tad uncomfortable, but doesn’t this give a better result in the long run?

If you just want someone to agree with you all the time, get a dog.

To maximise your development, improve your strategy and make your business management a lot easier, think about glasses.  Different eyes see the same things differently.

We have access to world-leading tools to assist you and your business identify the different styles and inform you of the differing ways people approach issues and communicate.  Having access to this information enables a far deeper and more open conversation to occur.  To find out more, give us a yell – we would love the opportunity to show you how these tools can really help you and your business flourish!

On Budgets, Cashflow and Your Business


Budgets, don’t we love them?

The federal government has just delivered its budget for the country – the feedback on which isn’t overly positive.

In your small business, what approach do you use for your budgeting?  Most budgets I see are based on the thinking of “last year plus 5%”.  I have also seen budgets done by some pretty large franchise businesses that are, to put it bluntly, crap.

A budget needs to be approached from the aspect of “is it realistic, is it achievable, is it based on solid assumptions?”  It also needs to take note of the environment within which the business operates.  Over the past couple of decades, we have seen budgeting and planning programs proliferate.  Search “Budget template” on Google and you will get 108 million results.  Like anything, having a tool and knowing how to use it are two completely different things.

Moving Forward 1

When you’re looking at your budgets, the issues you need to consider need to be delved into in some detail.  Here are some examples (and the questions aren’t extensive):

  • Increased sales (everyone works on this assumption) – where are they going to come from?  Who are we selling to?  Do we offer what they need? Can we supply the additional product/service and at what cost?  Is the market being disrupted?  Can we divert focus in to one or two high margin products that will deliver a better result?
  • Profit margins – what do we need to do to improve them?  What options do we have with pricing?  What product mix works to deliver the best margins?  Does our marketing support our pricing to deliver the margins?  Does our sales team understand the impact of margins (hint: most don’t)?  What are our competitors doing and where do we see them going?
  • Operating overheads- what are we doing to ensure we are getting “bang for our buck” on expenses?  What is happening with regard to our overheads and the potential to replace old approaches with new ones (esp software applications)?  What control do our people have over the costs incurred in operating the business?
  • Staffing – What do our team understand about the expectations and accountabilities of their roles?  What additional training and support would enable them to flourish?  What is the ideal team mix for a business such as where ours is moving?
  • Capital expenditure – do we have the right gear, in the right condition, to enable us to deliver what is needed to support our team and customers?  Do we need to invest in additional equipment to save costs over the medium/long term?  What is the best utilisation of our capital to deliver strong, sustainable results over the medium/long term?

As stated, the list above is only a “taster” for the questions that need to be asked prior to even thinking about what the budget looks like.  More often than not, where these types of questions are asked, they are asked after the budget has been done.  This is like putting the cart before the horse.

Once you have done your overall budget, I strongly recommend that you do a cashflow budget that ties in to it.  The assumptions you make in this should also be assessed to ensure you are making the right qualitative decisions for your business.  For example, we have been dealing with one of our customers relating to one of their major debtors.  Sure, the debtor (owes money to our guys) is a big customer.  But the margins they make on the work they do for them are really small.  Then, the debtor takes nearly four months to pay their account.   Is he really a customer that they want?  By the time they do the work, spend three months chasing payment (including heavy involvement from the Directors who could be better utilised building the business), the profit from doing the work has disappeared.  Is that really what you’re wanting in your business?  Maybe you already have it!

Doing the cashflow budget may cause you to go back and revisit your operating budget.  The assumptions made might be called into question.  This is a really powerful process to go through as you are considering all aspects of the performance of the business.

Remember that a budget is a forecast of what your results are going to look like.  Doing your budget with the approach that your inputs will drive your results will give you a far more robust, realistic and achievable plan than doing it “the old way”.

By approaching the process in a way that allows you to develop solid, detailed and explainable budgets, you will actually be in a position where you are in far greater control of your business and you will be able to use those budgets to make better decisions along the way through the year.  This moves you from working “in” the business to “on” the business.

Establishing budgets can be a time-consuming process.  Yet it is be very valuable.  The emphasis should be on qualitative questions to drive the quantitative outputs.  By just focusing on the quantitative aspects of budgeting, you are missing out on a great opportunity to maximise your return.  And isn’t this what you, as a business owner, should be looking to do?

If you want to (metaphorically) fall in love with your budgets once again, take the time to approach the process in a way which will enable you to get the reward and return you’re seeking.  Last year plus 5% doesn’t work.

If you want to discuss how we can assist you in developing a really solid budget (and cashflow budget) for your business in the lead up to the end of financial year, please get in touch.  Our first meeting is at no cost to you and is designed to provide you with significant value.  It just might lead to you achieving the results you’ve always wanted.

On Addition by Subtraction


Speaking with one of my crew recently and he made the very sage comment with regard to a strategic issue we’re dealing with at the moment:

It’s a case of addition by subtraction

I’d never heard this phrase before and I asked him for a translation.  The guts of the issue is that you can often get a lot better by removing things that clog you up or hold you back.  In effect and expanding the analogy, the removal of a cancer has a positive impact on your health!

This can the in the form of processes, procedures, people, clients or whatever.

Thinking further about that phrase, I realise just how powerful it is – often times you become more welded to the process or context rather than focusing on the outcome you’re striving to achieve.  It can be that you’ve always done “stuff” so you keep doing it, your loyalty to people (as staff or customers) or a supplier with whom you have dealt with for years makes you unable to see beyond your own version of reality.

You become blind to the issue and don’t take action when you really know that you should.

Reading “Leading Teams” by Ray McLean has alerted me to the fact that, as leaders, we need to listen to the feedback from our people (and our gut) when things start going wobbly.  It is also imperative that action is taken sooner rather than later to deal with the issue.

We recently had an issue where we changed suppliers in our business.  The effect of the change has been revolutionary – we’re getting better service, more personalised information and tailored reporting for our needs.  We’ve also gained access to a truck-load more options that were available through our previous supplier that, for whatever reason, they had decided to withhold from us.  This has enabled us to increase our offering and provide a greater range of solutions to our customers than were were able to before – not because they weren’t there, but because they weren’t made available to us.  Outcome?  Far more sales for us and our supplier, happier customers and better outcomes for all concerned.

We have subtracted, and it has lead to addition.

Similarly, over the years, we have found that where there is a change in staff, the outcome can be exceptionally positive.  I recall once occasion in our business where we acted too slowly to remove a “cancer” from the business.  By not acting more quickly, the damage they created was significant and took some time to repair.  I must admit though, that once they had gone, the reflection with the rest of us was “we should have done that sooner”.

Due to our loyalty to them and wish for the person concerned to take the opportunities to develop and become the best version of themselves, we stayed in the situation far too long.  It ended up that their best version of themselves wasn’t what we needed/wanted!

Can you see opportunities for addition by subtraction in your business?  Are there areas where you’re “blind” and unable to see beyond your version of reality?

You are not alone.

You can do something about it.

 

On Sun Tzu


Sun Tzu is familiar to most of us over 25 years of age who have been in and around business. A General in ancient China, he is credited as authoring “The Art of War”.

Reading through some information the other day, I came across a quote of his which is eminently applicable to our modern approach to business (and possibly, life):

Thus we may know that there are five essentials for victory:

1 He will win who knows when to fight and when not to fight;

2 He will win who knows how to handle both superior and inferior forces;

3 He will win whose army is animated by the same spirit throughout all its ranks;

4 He will win who, prepared himself, waits to take the enemy unprepared;

5 He will win who has military capacity and is not interfered with by the sovereign.

Reflecting on the passage, it became obvious that, in our busy lives, we can often forget that patience and culture can count for a hell of a lot when addressing the challenges we face.

Sun Tzu quote

Breaking down the components of the quote, the application to your business may well be seen as follows:

He will win who knows when to fight and when not to fight

A bit like picking your battles – there are some times when opportunities in business arise and you’re just not prepared to take them.  Or, you decide to take them but risk the whole operation in pursuit of the new goal.

There are always three options available when opportunities or challenges present themselves:

  1. Take it;
  2. Actively retreat from it; or
  3. Do nothing.

Where you determine your course of action, it is essential that you marshal your resources to give yourself the greatest chance of success.  If you don’t have the requisite resources (people, financial, fixed assets), then unless you can get hold of them in a hurry, the chance of a successful expansion are significantly lessened.  I have often seen businesses who lurch into a new area or operation or activity that offers great potential but they go too early.

Taking the opportunity is the “easiest” course of action, however you need to consider fully the impact that this will have on your existing business and its resources.  Effective planning and implementation around this needs to occur to ensure that you don’t kill the golden goose.

Actively retreating from the opportunity can be a very powerful but less intuitive approach.  How do you do this?  You might (for example), pass the opportunity off to a more appropriately resourced competitor who can exploit it.  They can take it on, and you can gain some flow of profit share by structuring the deal effectively.  This helps to ensure that you gain something from the opportunity rather than nothing.  There are many possible ways of doing this – they are somewhat limited only by your imagination!  It can often be a very powerful approach to maximise your returns whilst limiting your potential downside.

On numerous occasions over the years, I have suggested to customers that they don’t pursue an opportunity because they simply don’t have the capacity to take on the extra business and/or they are not positioned to undertake the development required to fully exploit the opportunity.  The “do nothing” option is always alive.  People often feel the need to “do something” and then rationalise it afterwards.  This can lead to very adverse outcomes as they will lurch forward without proper assessment and planning.

He will win who knows how to handle both superior and inferior forces

Working out the strengths and weaknesses of your team are vital to enabling you to make better judgments and more strategically utilise the strengths you have.  I have often heard the argument “but we’re too small”.  They may well perceive themselves as being too small, however the strength that comes from being small is agility and responsiveness.

Playing to your strengths can be a very powerful tool – along with playing on your preferred “patch”.  The David and Goliath story is a great metaphor in this regard.  By understanding your strengths and your opponents weaknesses, you are better able to play a game that will result in victory.  In many senses, the sheer size of a larger competitor can be a weakness as they are generally slower to react and marshal their resources to deliver a competitive response in time.  Their size actually conspires against them.

Playing to your strengths rather than trying to mitigate your weaknesses is a more positive and effective approach.  By trying to deal with your weaknesses, you will actually reduce the capacity of your strengths.  Marcus Buckingham has put it exceedingly well in this video.

He will win whose army is animated by the same spirit throughout all its ranks

Drucker wrote: “Culture eats strategy for breakfast”.

Where your culture is one which encourages and supports the growth and development of your people, you will have a business that is going to be far more effective and resilient than your competitors who have better technology or products but a disengaged workforce.

I have written much previously on the impact of positive and negative culture and encourage you to review the posts on this topic.

The video of Marcus Buckingham as linked above touches on this subject and you can see the effect of great cultures in some of the leading organisations today – Southwest Airlines, Disneyland and so on.

It comes down, at its essence, to trust.  If you provide your people with the tools and support to do their job then trust them to do it, they will perform far more effectively than where you “sit on them” and micro-manage them.

Are you adopting the most effective approach in managing your team?

He will win who, prepared himself, waits to take the enemy unprepared

Again, waiting for the opportune time rather than rushing into the fray can be a very powerful strategy.

Time is only a measure that we have invented – the real value in knowing your own team and knowing your competition is that you are better placed to exploit the opportunities that arise at a time that suits you.  If you progress forward at a time that suits them, you’re not giving your business the best chance of success.

Reacting to situations is a function of this.  By not feeling that you need to react to situations gives you the power to respond appropriately at a time of your own choosing.  This can give you a massive strategic advantage.

He will win who has military capacity and is not interfered with by the sovereign

Depending on the style of the leader of your organisation, they might or might not be the most qualified or appropriate person to lead new program delivery/opportunity exploitation.

Often times, the leader might feel they need to be at the front of the queue to deliver the strategy or implement the program.  This can be very demotivating to the team who has developed the strategy.  It can be seen as the leader taking all the glory.

Best to let the person/team who has developed the opportunity to run with it rather than come in at the last minute and usurp their role.  Chances are, they will be far better informed and capable than some “johnny come lately” who is seeking glory.

For a leader to swan in and try and deliver something they are not fully briefed on can be incredibly dangerous.  They will often miss vital parts of the puzzle or make the wrong moves/decisions/communications that end up derailing the project.

Sun Tzu may have detailed his thinking some 2,500 years ago, but it is highly relevant and applicable today.

On Muddle Management


The Australian Institute of Management has recently released a report on the perception v reality for middle management.

It is not pretty reading – especially if you’re a middle manager!

Now, the survey was conducted by AIM and Monash University and surveyed 1,898 people across the business spectrum and, according to the Press Release from AIM:

The survey participants said middle managers in their organisations are significantly underperforming across the range of key indicators including people management, communication and leadership

stuck-in-a-rut-dog

As AIM states,

Middle managers are the communication ‘gatekeepers’ in an organisation responsible for transmitting messages up and down the workforce ‘ladder’.  It is these managers who have a key role in shaping a company’s workplace culture and who help determine the success of productivity initiatives and major change programs.  Pacesetter organisations are those in which middle managers are in sync with their organisation’s vision, goals and business strategies.

It all comes back to the leadership within an organsiation – how well the goals and mission and vision of the business are communicated not only from those at the top, but through those all the way “down” in an organisation.  From my experience, there are not very many businesses that devote any time or effort to really get this information effectively all the way through their business.  Those that do are exceptionally successful, those that don’t wither and underperform.

Whilst the report encourages middle managers to take more responsibility to refine their own skill sets in the areas of  leadership, communication and staff management, the reverse is actually true – the owners/senior management within organisations need to provide their own leadership and support in this area.  “A fish rots from the head” is an apt analogy here.  Those “at the top” are obliged to provide what is needed for those reporting to them to deliver what is required.

With an effective strategy to engage and develop middle managers, organisations can truly excel.  We have seen loads of examples over the years where businesses have invested in processes and strategies that specifically address the need to communicate vision and mission and goals through and organisation (the Stages of Growth process is ideal for this and, being research based, is incredibly effective) and also to enable people within an organisation to understand and then play to their strengths (the Trimetrix Assessment is perfect for this).  The end result of undertaking these processes is that the organisation is healthier, more focussed and far more effective in what and how it does what it does.

One of the more telling components of the report states:

Our survey results confirm that now is the time to be more strategic when evaluating the contribution and capabilities of middle managers.  Certainly, if organisations are to maximise their performance in a marketplace that is becoming more global and more competitive by the day they need to ensure that middle mamagers are a positive asset, not a hindrance.

Where an organisation understands that middle management is there to provide the support, guidance and direction to the operations level of the business and then ensures that middle management has the right information, communication skills and leadership abilities, they will do exceptionally well.  Unfortunately, we often find that most organisations adopt one (or more of the following excuses – and this is not an exhaustive list):

  • we’re too busy
  • we don’t have the budget
  • our people aren’t up to this
  • we don’t have the time
  • it’s not onoe of our priorities at the moment.

Thinking such as this on the part of senior management will ensure that they won’t allow their organisation to thrive.  There will always be an excuse and there will always be the opportunity to work on the business to make it better.  By putting it off and/or ignoring the potential that exists within an organisation, the argument is that the owners/senior managers are being negligent.

So, if you want to invest and get a very solid return on the improvement that is waiting to happen within your organisation, why not get in touch?  The survey results show that most businesses are pretty crap at management of middle management.  By improving their performance in this area, they will significantly outperform their competitors and find life is a lot less stressful.

Nothing to lose, everything to gain.  It would seem stupid if you didn’t pursue the opportunity for your business.

By way of example, we did a Stages of Growth Xray with one of our customers the other month.  As a direct consequence, their gross margin increased from 34% to 51%.  Would you like to do that?

To read the report, please follow this link.

On Recruitment – and Getting it Right


We are all faced with the really challenging question when we decide to employ someone within our business or team:

Are they going to be the right fit and do they have the required skills and capacity to do what is required?

Having been involved in a number of spectacularly unsuccessful recruitment decisions in years past, I well understand the problems that arise when things go “pear shaped”. 

Thankfully, there are solutions available which will reduce the chances of a recruitment campaign going awry.  When you consider the amount of time, effort and expense involved in undertaking a new appointment, the use of strategies and approaches that will go a long way to ensuring the success of the program are well worth the investment made.

Previous readers will know that we utilise the Trimetrix Tool in our business and with a number of our customers.  I have previously provided examples on this blog about the successes that have been enjoyed by us in the application of Trimetrix during the recruitment process (and also, very successfully, in the performance improvement arena).

The understanding of a potential staff member’s approach to their work and the way they will assess situations is incredibly valuable when it comes to making the “right” decision.  Often times, we find that the Trimetrix report will highlight areas that you or their manageer need to be aware of to ensure that you can work effectively with them to maximise their contribution and engagement – not only with your business, but also with your customers.  The development of open and detailed discussions about approach and perspective for a new team member can be incredibly valuable.  It will also highlight areas where they have particular skills that can be utililsed in the business/team to improve overall performance and particularly engagement.

One other aspect of the Trimetrix Tool is that there have been a number of benchmarking assessments performed around the world.  The benchmarking uses the responses and experience of “elite performers” in certain industries and sectors to highlight the underlying traits and approaches that are common in the best performers in an industry.  My colleague, Russ Wylie, has recently undertaken one such program with some of the absolute top performing real estate sales people in Australia.  The benchmark that is being developed will then enable the businesses using this benchmark to recruit against a very specific set of criteria that will help to ensure the success of the recruiting program for staff to enter this industry.  Believe it or not, high performers in particular roles all have certain behavioural characteristics that “predispose” them to success in their chosen field. 

Imagine if your business had access to this type of information – how would it improve the assessment and focus of any recruiting campaign that you were to undertake?  How much time, effort and money would it save by reducing the chances of “getting it wrong”?

Using Trimetrix changes the order of words in my question above (and removes the question mark) to give:

They are going to be the right fit and they do have the required skills and capacity to do what is required.

It’s your choice.  Do you want to get it right?